Archives For social selling

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Welcome to our roundup of customer relationship management (CRM) industry news from across the web. This week’s roundup will revisit the some of the same social selling topics as our previous post but with more useful tips and tricks. We’re hunting the ‘net for the latest and greatest, and bringing them to you here, in one convenient weekly post.

Selling through social channels (a.k.a. social selling) is not only an art, but a science. New social channels are emerging every week, only increasing the surface area of digital touchpoints a customer or prospect may have. Those who know how to leverage their networks and hone the power of social media are able to excel in the ever changing sales landscape.

Sales 2.0

Sales 2.0 – Source: Forbes

Salespeople are more likely to meet or exceed their quotas if they engage on social media.
(Dynamic Signal)

Studies have been done to prove this point and salespeople are missing the boat ride to sales success. The following articles will teach you how to be a social selling specialist in no time.

5 Steps for Creating a Successful Social Selling Strategy
One of the golden rules in social selling is to identify where your prospective customers are spending time online. Being able to recognize who your customer is, where they spend their time, and what they like to do can be the driving factor in what closes a deal. Seth Price writes a simple 5 step process for developing your own successful social selling strategy.
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How to Use Twitter Hashtags as a Prospecting Tool
Let’s face it, Twitter is a loud party and sometimes it is hard to hear through the noise. Beyond the clamor hides some of your most relevant and valuable prospects. Twitter can provide a certain level of audience targeting through their Hashtag functionality in order to reach and engage with your next customer.
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Social Selling Action Plan: Seek A Warm Relationship
Social media is no longer about what someone had for lunch. Your future customers are waiting for you to contact them in the places they spend the most time. Matt Foulger will teach you how to turn cold calls into warm calls, gain a 360-degree view of your prospect, push intelligence from social media into your CRM, as well as various social engagement methods.
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The 10-60-30 Rule of Social Selling
Social Selling is more about the approach rather than the use of a number of tools. Over the course of time, this has evolved into a daily routine. My experience has demonstrated that the different steps and tools must be interwoven with everything you do during the day.” – Mic Adam
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We hope you enjoyed this week’s edition of our Weekly CRM Roundup. Go to where your customers are. They’re waiting for your targeted, personalized, and meaningful engagement. Got ideas for other great articles and topics we should include in future CRM Roundup posts? Let us know in the comments below!

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Welcome to our roundup of customer relationship management (CRM) industry news from across the web. This week’s roundup provides a plan of action and offers an understanding of what it takes to be successful in generating leads. We’re hunting the ‘net for the latest and greatest, and bringing them to you here, in one convenient weekly post.

If you reached this page, chances are you’re looking for insight on how to boost your lead generation success. In today’s day and age, the buying process has changed as marketers struggle to be heard through the noise. As they say, ‘Content is king’ and the handling of that content – both on your site and elsewhere on the web – is critical to your lead generation success.

68% of B2B businesses use landing pages to garner a new sales lead for future conversion. (MarketingSherpa)

The following articles should serve as easy first steps to help you acquire and retain higher-quality leads by meticulously adjusting semantics, understanding the purpose of lead nurturing, and thinking differently about gated content.

My Leads Have Run Dry: 3 Steps to Obtaining and Retaining Leads
Given that consumers are inundated with marketing messages all throughout the day, getting your message in front of the eyes of your target audience is becoming harder than ever. Once they’ve reached your website after being referred through a marketing channel (email, social media, webinar, etc.), there is still work to be done. This article outlines 3 steps on how to optimize your strategies to generate the quality leads you’re looking for.
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Social Media Lead Generation: Opening the Gate for Gated Content
Anqi Cong explores the pros and cons of gating and not-gating your content. She does a comparison on the effect of gating and its implication on social sharing and “virility”. It is estimated that gating content reduces downloads to 2-5% of what they could’ve been, but for a trade off of higher quality leads.
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Lead, Nurture, Or Get Out Of The Way
This article takes you through the steps of launching a successful lead nurturing campaign by first, locating and identifying your best prospects, and then by implementing the process itself.

“No matter how simple or complex the B2B environment, understanding how your product or service fits in with your prospect’s organization is the holy grail of long term success.” – Robert Minskoff
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Lead Generation: The Power of Copy
“Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind,” – Rudyard Kipling

The way words are received is directly correlated to the way they are spoken. John Tackett shows a simple way on how to see an increase in form conversion by tweaking one or a few words.
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We hope you enjoyed this week’s edition of our Weekly CRM Roundup. Go forth — tackle these easy lead generation actions and continue to create exceptional customer experiences. Got ideas for other great articles and topics we should include in future CRM Roundup posts? Let us know in the comments below!

Research image courtesy of Gartner, Inc.

Source: Gartner (June 2013) Research image courtesy of Gartner, Inc.

Found in a recent Gartner survey, 77% of American consumers go online looking for incentives relating to a purchase, and nearly one in two of them go online searching for effective problem solving. Meanwhile, as many as four times the number of people see a negative tweet as see a positive one. Wouldn’t it be better to see these people quickly and help them solve their problems, creating a positive brand awareness on social media rather than leave a negative perception of the brand?

By gaining visibility to customers’ social profiles, companies can discover who acts as brand advocates and influencers: who on Twitter posts positive messages (or negative ones) about customer service, who shares a particular buying experience by photographing a shirt or tie they recently bought on Instagram, or even who is connected to whom on LinkedIn to develop better in-roads into winning that all-important contract. The choices are endless.

Both B2B and B2C companies are relying on CRM to organise these insights about what customers are doing and buying, and to help establish predictive ability to know what and where to target next.

CRM gives this complete customer view by providing a single context of what the customer is doing — such as total wallet spend, or spending patterns — with a single entry point to not only analyse it, but to react to the information. Business rules and marketing drip campaigns can be driven off this data, but companies also gain the ability to see which individuals are brand ambassadors and who would be key to any successful loyalty programme integration.

Loyalty is a key theme at the moment, with many businesses seeking to not only maximize what they know about their customers, but to then enhance it with predictive behaviours and analysis that reward loyal customers and evangelists for the brand, and drive customers with similar behaviours to become stellar and vocal brand advocates.

At SugarCon 2014, I’ll be presenting on “Effective Social Media in your CRM” – we’ll be continuing this discussion on the use of social CRM to power effective loyalty programmes, as well as its application in targeted marketing campaigns and real-time customer support. Demonstrations of these systems in action will be showcased, along with customer stories of successful social CRM programmes for both B2B and B2C companies. I encourage you to attend this session to jumpstart your own consideration and integration of social CRM into your business!

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Welcome to our roundup of customer relationship management (CRM) industry news from across the web. This week’s roundup will contain some tips and tricks worth learning when it comes to social selling. We’re hunting the ‘net for the latest and greatest, and bringing them to you here, in one convenient weekly post.

Recent studies show that social marketing has far greater rates of return than that of traditional outbound marketing.

Social media has a 100% higher lead-to-close rate than outbound marketing. (State of Inbound Marketing, 2012)

Here are a few tips and tricks to help get your organization on the path to being a social selling machine.

7 Ways Your Sales Team Can Get Results with B2B Social Media
“Are your salespeople actively engaged in social media as part of their lead generation efforts? If not, they (and your business) are missing out on great opportunities for researching potential B2B clients, building new networks and uncovering prospects by investigating their social media profiles.” – Jeremy Durant

Jeremy offers a play-by-play list of ways to encourage your sales team to embrace social media.
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Social Selling Dos & Don’ts
Lauren Barack offers her insight when considering the dos and don’ts of social selling. She highlights the importance of the quality over quantity of your prospects and shares relevant scenarios of making social selling work for you.
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How to Generate More Leads and Referrals on LinkedIn
Do you have 20 minutes to spend in the day? Follow these 10 steps to make the most of LinkedIn and prospect more effectively.
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Got ideas for other great articles we should include in future CRM Roundup posts? Let us know in the comments below!

SugarCRM is the first CRM provider to be named “Ready for IBM Smarter Commerce,” which means the Sugar platform r4_smarter_commerce.jpgsupports and inter-operates seamlessly with core IBM Smarter Commerce components, including IBM Campaign and Interact, IBM Websphere Commerce, and IBM Sterling Commerce. As the current state of business, fueled by advancements in social, mobile and cloud technologies changes the way companies market and sell, IBM’s Smarter Commerce portfolio combined with Sugar can help enterprises of all sizes better meet these current and future challenges.

IBM Smarter Commerce turns customer insight into action, enabling new business processes that help companies buy, market, sell and service their products and services to today’s modern customer. With deep integrations into key Smart Commerce offerings, SugarCRM puts the “i” in Smarter Commerce.

What does it mean to put the “i” in Smarter Commerce? It means that SugarCRM extends IBM Smarter Commerce to customer-facing individuals such as sales and service representatives. For example, with IBM and SugarCRM, campaign management programs can be driven down to specific, actionable, in-context leads placed in the daily activity stream of individual sellers. Or, individual customer care agents can view the entire history of a given customer’s interactions, and can see targeted real-time recommendations right from within their call center application.

The result: faster campaign-to-cash, more efficient marketing and sales processes, and higher customer satisfaction and value.

For more information on how SugarCRM complements IBM Smarter Commerce and other IBM products and services, see sugarcrm.com/ibm

The shift from transactional selling to solution selling has turned business people into something akin to therapists. Today’s best sales people need to immerse themselves in their customers’ problems and create customized, long-term solutions to these challenges. They can’t just take orders for what they have on the shelf, but rather map their products to their customers’ pain points and unlock the value of their solution.

It’s the difference between saying, “Would you like to super size your French fries?,” and asking, “So you need French fries. Tell us more about the current lack of fries in your organization. Have you considered Belgian fries? If you had better fries, would you be better positioned to hit your goals?” Customer problems are far more complex these days, which means it’s your job to think through the in-depth answers.

Social selling tools, or “social CRM,” can help businesses understand these new and complex problems, and address them (and solve them) even before their customers can properly articulate them. By staying social with customers, you can identify and squash problems before they affect a business – something for which your customers may never stop thanking you.

Unfortunately, not enough companies make it possible for their employees to talk to each other in this manner, much less talk to customers: A recent study from IABC and Prescient Digital Media notes that 39 percent of companies don’t have any social tools on their intranets. On the other hand, research is showing that the benefits of this social interaction are real: An ongoing McKinsey & Company study is clocking such outcomes as increased market share and reduced time to market.

Social tools are a big help in gaining benefits like faster time to market and higher customer satisfaction, but they need to work in concert with each other to have any real impact. Random tweets and off-the-cuff blog posts that are not part of a larger customer relationship strategy will just become noise. Here’s a more cohesive, five step approach to creating an ongoing dialogue with customers and showcasing the good work that you do to ensure satisfaction.

Social CRM building block #1: Your social profile. If you haven’t done it already, create your LinkedIn or Xing (in Europe) profiles.  This is where you list your industry experience and tell the world why you enjoy selling what you sell.  You will be amazed at how often your prospects and customers look at your LinkedIn profile to see who you are, what you look like, where you went to school, how long you have been in the industry.  They want to know what makes you tick.  Why?  Because people buy from people.

Social CRM building block #2: Your blog. This is where you expand on the ideas you have been posting to Twitter and LinkedIn. Think of the blog as the online equivalent of giving a keynote speech at an event. You’ll profess your position on issues most important to your customers, and see if you can generate any interest (in this case, via comments on blog posts). Posting at least once a week will help your audience get into the habit of turning to your blog for guidance.  Starting your personal blog at wordpress.com is easy and free.  Figuring out what to post can be harder.  This is where you should focus more on being conversational than pontific and let your natural voice that you use with your customers come out.  What do you talk about with your prospects every day?  Well, write it up in a series of short blog posts.

Social CRM building block #3: Dialogue in the Forums. If your company doesn’t have a corporate forums site, it’s easy to start a Group in LinkedIn about your company or just your industry. Think of this as the Q&A session that follows your keynote speech. This is where the conversation really starts. Ideally, you and your team start these conversations with provocative questions, like: Why do we even need XYZ product? Why can’t anyone seem to solve such-and-such a problem? Then listen to the answers, and keep the dialogue going. Don’t waste everyone’s time with “soft” questions – you need to hear the dirt if you’re really going to uncover the customer problems you need to solve. For key members of the sales team, I’d suggest spending at least one hour a day on reading, developing, and responding to such questions.

Social CRM building block #4: Twitter: Here’s where you start getting the word out about the insightful conversations you’re having in the discussion forums, and the thought leadership that appears on your blog. Tweet out the best nuggets from the forums, engage in skirmishes (hopefully, polite ones) among the subject-matter experts and begin attracting attention for the community you are building. Posting at least once a day will entice your audience to connect and follow your online commentary. I suggest using HootSuite, a free social media tool, to help you monitor your social activity streams and quickly post to your social outlets.  I also like Paper.li for automatically tweeting content on a daily basis that I find interesting.

Social CRM building block #5: Internal social networks: This step doesn’t involve direct communication with customers, but it does help you disseminate the knowledge you’ve gained to the rest of our team. And by the “team,” I don’t just mean sales. When customers aren’t happy, it’s not just the sales people who should be getting nervous – it’s everyone from the CEO on down. Therefore, when you think about connecting with customers and understanding what makes them tick, you need to think about giving everyone access to these conversations. You can use internal social networks like IBM Connections or Jive to make sure that your colleagues have a way to share customer interactions in an always-on environment.

The end result of these social CRM building blocks is that you can uncover more effective ways to connect people with problems (that’s your customers) to the people with solutions (that’s you). It’s also the best way to cut through much of the noise surrounding customer needs, and let discussions bubble up about the real challenges that need to get addressed – and that will drive your business success.