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Gartner recently named SugarCRM as a Visionary for the second straight year in its Magic Quadrant for Sales Force mobile_combinedAutomation. Sugar’s innovative mobile user experience, and flexible deployment options were cited as reasons for the continued strong ranking.

Also, SugarCRM took home five awards as part of CRM Magazine’s annual Market Leader Awards thanks to the innovative nature of the software, as well as the way it empowers novel CRM deployments – such as Redglaze Group’s CRM Elite winning deployment.

All this recent recognition got me thinking: what does it truly mean to be a visionary when it comes to CRM? I think, in Sugar’s case, it comes down to three key differentiating points:

Innovative User Experience: Sugar has long been focused on user empowerment – making CRM a mission-critical tool for customer-facing employees, and not a simple data capture mechanism. Sugar’s ubiquitous, intuitive experience across all mobile and desktop touch points is a key differentiator.

Flexible Platform: Hands down, no other CRM provider offers such an open, extensible and scalable platform for CRM. The open nature of Sugar allows any user to customize and integrate with nearly any other data source or application.

Value: In a long-term CRM deployment, value comprises far more than just “what the system costs.” So again, when choosing a more open and extensible platform, the total cost over time is far less than a proprietary app or platform. The available talent around open, standards-based platforms is more abundant and less expensive, and the ease of extension given the lack of proprietary limitations generates greater lifetime value.

I believe that today, CRM is a market in transition. We are starting to see concepts like mobile, big data analytics and cross-departmental process automations shift from “nice to have” aspects of a CRM turn into “must haves.” In my opinion, only the most flexible, scalable, highly user-focused platforms, which provide the most value for the investment – will thrive in this new era of CRM.

Want to hear more about our visionary take on CRM? SugarCRM’s CMO Jennifer Stagnaro will be highlighting some great customer success stories aligned with our vision at Gartner’s Symposium IT Expo event in Orlando, Florida on October 7th.

 

 

As concepts like social media, mobile and big data add more and more information into the marketing mix, it is important for sales and marketing Summit Graphicprofessionals to embrace the concepts behind data-driven marketing. In today’s world, those taking advantage of the mountains of information available around our customers are the ones who will not only survive, but thrive and bat the competition.

To help marketers gain more insight around data-driven marketing, AgileOne is holding a FREE online conference all day on May 9th. As part of the event, SugarCRM co-founder and CTO Clint Oram will be speaking about how SugarCRM allows its users to delight today’s social customer.

The entire online conference is filled with great presenters and topics. Click here to register for free and join the conversation!

We here at SugarCRM are coming off an AMAZING week. In addition to gathering in San Francisco with our customer and partners at SugarCon, we sugarcrm-dashboardalso celebrated our tenth anniversary as a company. All throughout SugarCon, we talked about the Power of “i” and what it means in terms of empowering more individuals in the organizations we serve to be more effective every time they engage with a customer, and to simply perform their jobs better. A huge part of empowering companies to harness the power of “i” comes from the innovative user experience found in Sugar 7. We designed Sugar 7 with the individual in mind – aiming at offering a unique UI that gives users more actionable insight on every screen, as well as a more collaborative approach to CRM. In short, giving users what is most relevant to the tasks at hand – nothing more, nothing less.

Just before SugarCon, analysis firm Software Advice rated their Top 5 Favorite SFA Software User Interfaces, and I can say I am not surprised that Sugar 7 made the list. Here is what the author of the report told SugarCRM he was looking for when making their evaluations:

“When we were evaluating SFA user interfaces (UIs), we looked for designs that included intuitive, unobtrusive navigation systems; clear, aesthetically pleasing reports; and sensible layouts that make smart use of space to emphasize important information. Our favorites combine all these elements (and others) to make using the software both painless for the uninitiated and lightning-fast for SFA veterans,” says Jay Ivey, Managing Editor at Software Advice.

And while Ivey and Software Advice were not necessarily keen to our Power of “i” concept before writing the report, his description of why Sugar 7 made the cut speaks directly to the vision we hold around empowering individual users:

“We chose SugarCRM as one of our favorite interfaces for a lot of reasons, but we especially liked how easy it is for users to customize every aspect of their experience. With a wide range of drag-and-drop dashlets (which are basically widgets containing elements such as opportunity forecasts or contact information), it’s easy to make dashboards your own,” says Ivey. “Once you curate and arrange information to best suit your particular needs, you’ll find yourself wasting less time clicking through multiple screens to access what you’re looking for.”

The validation from Software Advice is not simply a nice kudos to a well designed product. Instead, it is a deeper validation of SugarCRM’s innovative vision in a marketplace that for many years has remained somewhat static. In my opinion, our refreshing approach to user enablement sets us apart, and it is great to see third parties agreeing as well.

The following is a guest post by Ginger Tulley, Senior Director of Marketing, Strategic Alliances at Dun and Bradstreet

Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) has been in the data business for 170 years. And in that time, the market for data hasn’t changed all that much. Until now.d&b_logo - no tagline.jpg

We have entered a whole new age of data. One in which streams of information can be delivered as services over the web, and appear as part of an application’s interface, with no action needed on the user’s part. Where new business models are built around data marketplaces, so anyone can subscribe to content and integrate it into workflows in ways never considered before. The world is opening up, and every day people are looking to do things better.

That’s just what SugarCRM has done, on behalf of its users. It’s taken a wonderful step to make it easier for sales, marketing and customer service teams to be more effective in their work by streaming data directly into their CRM. End users who have struggled to keep the prospect and customer information in their CRMs current and accurate no longer have to manually enter data or buy static lists.

They can just use D&B for Sugar, the service we’ve jointly announced today.

Sugar users can enrich their prospect or customer records with a single click.

Sugar users can enrich their prospect or customer records with a single click.

 

After working in the software industry for longer than I care to admit, one thing has become clear to me: Software needs to be easier to use. It should support the way people want to work, and not force them to plug in values because the software demands it. CRM systems are getting smarter, faster and more intuitive – and SugarCRM is one company leading the way.

Want to read more about today’s announcement? Check out SugarCRM Evangelist Martin Schneider’s guest blog post on our Partner blog, or visit the D&B for Sugar product page.

SugarCRM is the first CRM provider to be named “Ready for IBM Smarter Commerce,” which means the Sugar platform r4_smarter_commerce.jpgsupports and inter-operates seamlessly with core IBM Smarter Commerce components, including IBM Campaign and Interact, IBM Websphere Commerce, and IBM Sterling Commerce. As the current state of business, fueled by advancements in social, mobile and cloud technologies changes the way companies market and sell, IBM’s Smarter Commerce portfolio combined with Sugar can help enterprises of all sizes better meet these current and future challenges.

IBM Smarter Commerce turns customer insight into action, enabling new business processes that help companies buy, market, sell and service their products and services to today’s modern customer. With deep integrations into key Smart Commerce offerings, SugarCRM puts the “i” in Smarter Commerce.

What does it mean to put the “i” in Smarter Commerce? It means that SugarCRM extends IBM Smarter Commerce to customer-facing individuals such as sales and service representatives. For example, with IBM and SugarCRM, campaign management programs can be driven down to specific, actionable, in-context leads placed in the daily activity stream of individual sellers. Or, individual customer care agents can view the entire history of a given customer’s interactions, and can see targeted real-time recommendations right from within their call center application.

The result: faster campaign-to-cash, more efficient marketing and sales processes, and higher customer satisfaction and value.

For more information on how SugarCRM complements IBM Smarter Commerce and other IBM products and services, see sugarcrm.com/ibm

maglassWhen talking about the CRM market, a lot of numbers are thrown around. Analyst firms like Gartner and IDC do amazing jobs of calculating the annual spend in the market, which will be more than $30bn in a few years. There are lots of huge companies selling CRM software (usually among other technology pieces), and the space gets a lot of news coverage.

But while these numbers and the continual buzz in CRM seems impressive…is it really?

SugarCRM co-founder and CTO Clint Oram and I have had an ongoing dialog for nearly a year now, about how the CRM industry has – in a lot of ways – utterly failed to live up to its potential over the past two decades.

“Failed?” You ask?

Yes, a big #Fail.

What we have been talking about internally is that the CRM industry now serves roughly 20-25m end users (you can take a composite of all research and it usually ends up around this number give or take a few million users). Now, while this seems like a big number, let’s look at some other “relationship management” tools out there and their user counts:

LinkedIn (professional relationship management): 200m+ Users

Facebook (personal relationship management): 1bn+ Users.

When we stack CRM up against similar (yet admittedly consumer oriented) concepts, CRM falls down in comparison in terms of seeding its total addressable market. Clint calls this, “The Case of the Missing Zero.” And I agree, why aren’t we asking the bigger questions about CRM, namely: Why is this a 20m user market and not a 200m market today?

I think the answer lies both in looking at the success of companies like Facebook and LinkedIn, and also in the history of business technology. In short, CRM originated in a time before such life-changing trends as: the internet, social media, cloud, mobile…pick your buzzword. Early CRM was expensive, difficult to deploy, and benefitted management and not the actual front-line users of CRM – those who deal with prospects and customers. And a lot of expensive, traditional CRM deployments are now in place, lack the modernity expected by today’s workforce, which only exacerbates the issue. And, what’s more, nearly every traditional CRM providers’ offerings were built in this pre-web/social/mobile/cloud era and are thus ill equipped to meet the needs of the individual user.

But…there is hope. If we as an industry start focusing more on the actual users of CRM, and build tools that help them do their jobs, not simply capture data, we can bridge this huge adoption gap.These tools should be simple to use, mobile friendly, and not only make sense of the mounds of structured and unstructured data about every customer – but provide fast and valuable insight around this data to every user at every turn.

And by creating pricing that actually works with companies to put the software in more users’ hands – we can start seeing the true promise of CRM. This isn’t about selling more software (well, in some ways it is), but rather empowering more people in the organization who touch the customer. It’s not about having to make hard decisions about who does and who does not get to use the tools designed to improve the lifeblood of your business – your customers – it’s about giving everyone access to the information they need to provide better service, make more informed decisions, and simply promote better customer relationships.

We are making headway in this area, and made some significant announcements this morning to that effect. While it is early in what I feel is a transformative time in CRM, I am excited. By bringing innovation back into this industry in a big way, empowering more individuals in every company we serve, and simply helping make great customer experiences happen, I hope to see this industry find that missing zero (yes, everyone not just SugarCRM) and show what a difference great CRM can really make.

The folks at Software Advice are performing an in-depth survey to better understand how individual users of CRM surveysystems interact with the software: what works, what could be improved, etc.

Since we here at SugarCRM are always looking to learn more about the industry, but especially looking to learn more about what individual users are looking to get out of the system, we wanted to help spread thew word.

Want to have your voice heard? Want to help shape the future of CRM? Take the survey HERE.