Archives For December 2010

Does Santa Use SugarCRM?

Jan Sysmans —  December 20, 2010 — Leave a comment

I just wanted to share a little Sugar-themed holiday fun from our UK partner EnableIT.  This came from a listing on the SugarCRM LinkedIN group. I’ve also added a few of my own…

Signs that Santa Claus might be using SugarCRM:

  • Every year, without fail, he knows which leads to follow up, based on a selection criteria of naughty or nice.
  • His scheduling calendar ensures that he meets ALL his appointments on time and can plan the most efficient route based on those appointments.
  • His marketing schedule is bang on, meaning he doesn’t needlessly waste money out of season promoting services and products that won’t be taken up.
  • He has built up such a loyal customer base that THEY actually contact HIM well ahead of their deadlines to let him know what they want, to ensure he can get it rolled out on time.
  • Although he is meeting tight deadlines, his marketing methods are such that he can still find time to go out canvassing for new customers in shopping centres and other target areas.
  • He has streamlined the “letters to Santa” concept with fast, simple web-to-lead forms in Sugar.
  • He can check “Naughty or Nice” status of key contacts in real time, any time and anywhere using Sugar Mobile on his iPhone.

Would love to hear some of your own!

Santa Logs in to Sugar Pro to check real time updates to his Naughty/Nice Dashboard

Editor’s Note: The Sapient Salesman began as a series of internally-focused sales coaching pieces written by SugarCRM team member Erin Fetsko. While initially focused on “selling Sugar,” Erin’s advice and wisdom have proven useful to Sugar partners, and well, anyone in the business of sales. Thus, we are happy to add her insight to the Sugar corporate blog. You can read all of Erin’s musings at The Sapient Salesman.

Remember the days when you vehemently opposed getting a smart phone? You hated how your husband couldn’t seem to leave it alone for a entire meal and you vowed to forgo the hyper-connectivity in favor of actual human interaction. Remember teasing everyone about how their blackberry was simply too big for your dainty pockets? Going on to preach how the last thing you need is to give your mom another reason to criticize your purse-free lifestyle. And really, who needs that much access anyway? You’re online all day, when you’re out, it’s because you need to put the Internet down!

… okay, maybe that was just me …

Well, 11 days ago I caved and got a smart phone and I’ll begrudgingly admit, I’m hooked. But not for the perpetual email access and reliable phone call reasons you might think. I’ve come to realize that despite their functionality border-lining on excessive, these phones aren’t themselves evil.

Okay, DUH! But many people have the same stick-in-the-mud attitude toward software. Even I, who generally advocates loudly for the excessive use of technology, found myself irrationally, passionately, cynically advocating for the status quo.

As technical salespeople, we too soon forget how scary change can be, but as they say: with great risk comes great reward. When you find yourself up against a prospect whose breezed thru the sales cycle, the guy who saw the demo – loved it, understands the value prop , and has the budget to buy, only to find them suddenly coming up with wildly off the wall objections at contract time, remember they might just be afraid to change. As soon as they sign, they get to start realizing all the great benefits you’ve promised and maybe they just aren’t ready to be home every day for dinner. Who knows “the wife” might be a sub par chef.

Remind them of the last time they took a technological leap that seemed excessive or risky or one that forced them to break a bad habit, and ask them if they would ever go back to the old way. You don’t see VCRs, answering machines or phone books  giving DVRs, voicemail and Facebook a run for their money anymore. So why should Rolodexes, spreadsheets and Post-it notes continue to blockade your prospects road to CRM success?

In fact, less than a week after seeing the shiny new world the flashlight app on my Droid illuminated, I’ve already talked my never-had-a-text-plan-in-her-life mother into getting one too. So I guess the moral of the story this week is: I’m a hypocrite. (Just kidding.) Seriously tho, you may find that once your most stubborn prospects allow themselves to try Sugar, they won’t only improve their own processes (and your bottom line), they just might turn into your biggest advocates.

Editor’s note: This blog post originally appeared in the UK-based B2B Marketing magazine blog series. And, since I think these are points worth repeating (and I wanted to get a blog post out this week!) I am reprinting my thoughts hereAlso note, while it’s true I am too lazy to change spelling back to American English – I think the British English stylizing gives my thoughts a bit of an air of respectability ;)

The explosion of social media over the past several years has certainly begun to make its mark in the business world. What started out as a primarily consumer-driven concept has become big business on many fronts: companies are marketing to customers via social networks; supporting customers and identifying trouble spots via Twitter; and leveraging these new social channels for market research and to qualify leads.

While social channels present an opportunity, companies must not forget the core foundations that actually manage the core data and processes within the organisation. New concepts like ‘social CRM’ are appealing for many reasons. But, ultimately, are not a replacement for traditional CRM. Rather, it is more important to augment existing CRM strategies and systems with social tools – because abandoning core systems could lead to chaos inside the organisation.

To best navigate your move into social CRM, it is useful to ask yourself five simple questions before spending precious time and other resources towards a social media endeavour:

1. Where are my customers and prospects aggregating online?

This seems fairly simple, but might be more complex than it seems.  For large B2C organisations, it may be enough to blast messaging across sites like Facebook. But for more niche markets and products, or more specialised B2B sales models – it may take some more research and listening to your customers before you begin any outreach via social channels.

2. How will this social initiative enhance the customer experience?

Just being social for the sake of being social is useless, and can backfire. For many B2B sales and support organisations, social media should be a means of adding convenience to the sales or customer support cycle – not an intrusive waste of time. Insure that your social interactions are a benefit, not a detractor to the overall customer experience.

3. Am I using social media to hide deeper flaws in my business?

Many companies are using social media as a “band-aid” to hide poor support processes or other problem areas. Customers who tweet about a bad experience get preferential treatment; but what does that really solve?  Before adding layers of social engagement, try to insure your customer-facing processes are already strong before exposing them to the hyper-critical social channels.

4. Who will be responsible for our social outreach?

This is a huge problem area for those looking to jump into social business. If you are going to generate leads, or attempt to handle customer complaints via social media – insure that a proper escalation path is in place. If a customer reaches out via social media and gets no response – it is almost worse than not having a social policy. Insure the right people are in place to quickly and consistently manage inquiries received via social channels.

5. How will I track and measure success?

It is very easy for a social media initiative to create even more data silos, with loads of data not providing insight. However, if you tightly integrate your social tools and data with well-structured existing systems like a CRM tool, you can more effectively track interactions and outcomes. Again, social CRM is not a new concept in itself – we are just using new technology to do what we have always done as  businesspeople: attract and manage customer relationships.

Many of the Outsiders readers might remember that last year we spoofed Marc Benioff’s book Behind the Cloud last year at Dreamforce. That stunt caused quite a stir, and this year we decided to make things a little less personal and a little more jovial, as it is the holiday season after all.

So, the marketing team got together and penned some “holiday carols” that tell our side of the CRM story, as well as throw some light-hearted barbs towards salesforce. All in fun, right? You can check out the complete carol book and lyrics here.

The main thrust of the campaign was to guarantee salesforce.com users at least 50% off their CRM subscription fees by switching to SugarCRM – and to make the switch seamless, we will waive the data migration fee.

To top it all off, we hired some professional “carolers” to sing selections from the song book outside the Moscone center as the attendees of Dreamforce piled in for the kickoff keynote. The crowd loved the carols, many chimed in, and tons of people snapped photos and videos and took home souvenir carol books for themselves.

Here are a few clips of the singers singing:

All in all, it was a fun event and we had a great time with all the singers and all the people who stopped by and chatted with us about SugarCRM.  Thanks to everyone who helped make the caroling such a fun and successful event!

Editor’s Note: The Sapient Salesman began as a series of internally-focused sales coaching pieces written by SugarCRM team member Erin Fetsko. While initially focused on “selling Sugar,” Erin’s advice and wisdom have proven useful to Sugar partners, and well, anyone in the business of sales. Thus, we are happy to add her insight to the Sugar corporate blog. You can read all of Erin’s musings at The Sapient Salesman.

People say silicon valley was founded by proud members of the autism spectrum. Having spent most of my adult life navigating the minefield of idiosyncratic behavior many uber geeks lay, I’d believe it. The engineer charm makes way for exceptional development power which yields truly valuable solutions. I often joke: there’s only so much room in one mind … you can’t expect me to be clever and nice at the same time. But this got me thinking, do successful CRM adoptions fall on a spectrum as well?

Sugar’s CRM adoption curve outlines a framework to establish where a business is, and guide it as its processes mature. But how do we measure success at each step? I often boast that SugarCRM successfully uses Sugar to manage their business; I use this morsel to imply a perspicacious persona and gain the trust of prospects. But does anyone truly adopt and use a CRM system the way we advertise?

During my stint with support I worked cases. Cases that had subjects, descriptions and substantive notes. Cases that reflected time spent and actual work done. Today I also work cases. These cases, however, sport a combined subject and description that, on a good day, contain 4 words: demo | customer needs demo. Both implementations are “successful,” but one yielded a reportable, measurable way to track employee efficacy. The other only relieves me of several hours a week as I futilely map disjointed email conversations to cases with the hope my efforts reflect resource consumption.

We sell a vision like that of a modern Corona commercial: people on a beach reviewing perfect reports on their favorite flash enabled tablet PC. The epitome of hands off visibility and insight into their company’s heath. Too soon we forget about the poor schmuck who runs around the office populating the data that drives these reports. I wonder if my fellow salesmen really appreciate what it takes to successfully adopt CRM.

When Sugar is an afterthought, when users start their day in other systems, or when employees see Sugar merely as a way to “getting credit” for work done – an otherwise “adopted” system remains at risk. One day the guy holding it all together, back-filling the data for reporting purposes, will leave and the implementation will fall apart. Truly successful CRM adoption results from a more socialistic approach. Every user of the system must prepare themselves to actively participate, and it’s important to communicate the commitment necessary to have a plenary implementation with sweeping adoption.